Special Sessions

Important announcement:

In the upcoming days, we will update this page with interesting new special session topics that have been accepted for IDRiM2022. In addition, the invited speakers for each session will be also announced.  Therefore, we kindly ask you to follow the IDRiM2022 Conference website to remain well informed!

Improving Disaster Risk Management Practice: Engagement 🡨🡪 Activism

Session rationale:

This Special Session Proposal addresses IDRiM 2022’s theme of “Challenges of Moving from Research to Practice.” The idea that disaster risk management research should address important organizational, social, and cultural issues to produce actionable knowledge is at the heart of “engagement.” Indeed, disaster risk management researchers often “engage” with local communities, regional organizations, or national institutions to co-construct knowledge and drive transformation. However, what happens when communities, organizations, or institutions refuse to engage due to perceived threats to political, economic, or parochial interests? When should researchers seeking to affect change consider shifting from a strategy of engagement to a strategy of activism using vigorous public campaigning that may involve media outreach, letter-writing and petitions, demonstrations, protests, or other forms of advocacy? Under what conditions? And with what consequences? Numerous researchers have shown how collective action is relevant to support local campaigns connected to rights and justice in the aftermath of disasters (or in avoiding disasters in the first place). This roundtable asks IDRiM members and stakeholders to reflect on their own choices concerning engagement and activism to better understand the uncertainties, tradeoffs, benefits, and limitations. Questions explored will include:

  • What strategies can/should researchers use to coax reluctant communities, organizations, or institutions to engage?
  • When should engaged research transform into public activism?
  • What are the tradeoffs (professionally and personally) when considering an “engaged” or “activist” orientation to disaster risk management research and practice?
Session organizers:
Speakers:

New advances in Multi-Hazard and Multi-Risk Analysis and Management

Session rationale:

There is an increased scientific and policy consensus that approaches to single natural hazard risk assessment and management underestimate risks and result in inadequate management approaches. Therefore, in order to build disaster resilience, there is a need for multi-hazard and multi-risk assessment and management, taking into account a variety of hazard interrelationships (e.g., triggering, compound, consecutive, amplifying). In this session, we will explore ways to characterize multi-hazard interrelationships, present innovative methodologies for multi-risk assessment based on systemic risk thinking, and explore enabling and hindering environments of multi-risk management and governance. In particular, the session will focus on key prospects and challenges ahead and how they could be overcome.

Session organizers:

Disaster Mitigation and Earth Observations: The European Plate Observation System (EPOS) perspective

Session rationale:

In order to take preventive action on the effects of natural and man-made phenomena on society, we need to understand more about the Earth’s processes responsible for them. Novel measurement technologies, additional sensors and increasing data processing capacities offer new opportunities to answer some of the currently most pressing societal and environmental questions.

Over time, both at the national and European levels, vast seismological, geophysical, and geological data has accumulated and been used by various research networks to better understand the Earth. Consequently, Europe needs to develop a long-term strategy and infrastructure capable of investigating the physical processes that control earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and tsunamis and the processes that control the Earth’s tectonics and surface dynamics. Therefore, comprehending these processes and forecasting them has required coordination at the European and national levels. Since 2010, a pan-European initiative has been launched to integrate the existing Earth Physics research infrastructure. These infrastructures are distributed in different European countries, and massive exchanges of data, information, and data processing models occur.

Earth observation data can contribute to more effective decision-making, producing information that can be used to identify emerging environmental problems and changes and to monitor ongoing natural phenomena. The EPOS Delivery Framework aims to support this endeavour in the solid Earth domain by providing access to data, products, and services supporting multidisciplinary analyses for a wide range of users.

This session aims to bring together different stakeholders involved in disaster mitigation and Earth observation activities, from data and service providers to end-users, providing an opportunity to share best practices and experiences and providing opportunities to advance our understanding of disaster risk, highlighting, in the same time, existing gaps and future research directions. We especially welcome presentations looking at existing available monitoring data and research-based services, figuring out feasible solutions and mechanisms to enable decision-makers, urban and land planners, and disaster managers to have access to actionable information and data useful to their daily work.

Session organizers:

Community Participation in Disaster Risk Reduction worldwide: Emic and Etic Perspectives

Session rationale:

There is increasing recognition of the importance of community participation in integrated disaster risk management. In spite of the fact that community participation has become a buzzword within Disaster Risk Reduction, there is no consensus regarding its definition, its process, its techniques, and its outcomes. Community participation has been defined, understood, and practiced in a variety of ways by scholars and practitioners. Its implementation remains uncertain due to the lack of an agreed-upon framework. The problem becomes particularly acute in the regions such as Asia and South Pacific, the most disaster-prone region of the world. Community-based disaster risk management or participatory DRR has been defined, designed, and implemented globally in accordance with western philosophical perspectives. For example in South Asia, this etic perspective of community participation poses a significant challenge to generalizing any systematic approach and developing tools for implementation of community-based disaster risk reduction in real life. Practitioners often abandon community-based DRR while attempting to forcefully incorporate borrowed concepts, mechanisms, and tools of participation in their indigenous systems. This etic approach to DRR fails to recognize locally available good practices and models of community-based DRR in Asia. The so-called theoretically successful participatory models and approaches have no real-life impact on a community’s disaster resilience. Therefore, it is imperative to understand the community involvement in disaster recovery in Asia from both an emic and etic perspective in order to establish a realistic, feasible strategy for the region that has the highest rate of disasters. In this session, we invite case studies, project experiences, field surveys, and models and frameworks related to community participation in disaster risk reduction globally. 

Session organizer:

Minority communities in DRR

Session rationale:

This session aims to present and discuss the roles of minority communities (e.g., racial/cultural/religious communities) in DRR. Although such minorities tend to be vulnerable in a disaster, some of them have worked as critical stakeholders in DRR. To increase the effectiveness of disaster risk reduction activities at all levels—one of the critical themes of IDRiM conference—, we have to pay attention to such communities, and thus the session fits the conference. The session also welcomes the presentations not only by researchers but also by practitioners and stakeholders.

Session organizer:

Implementation gaps are persistent phenomena in disaster risk management: can they guide the development of an implementation science?

Session rationale:

A focus on implementation has long been one of the core-defining features of the IDRiM Society. Now,  as IDRiM embarks on its journey into a third decade, is IDRiM prepared to offer the clearer concepts and definitions needed to begin developing an implementation science? Furthermore, is IDRiM ready to take practical initiating steps for developing such a science? 

The main purpose of this session is to stimulate what we hope will be an ongoing discussion of these issues. We suggest that an examination of “implementation gaps” will provide a good conceptual pathway for developing an implementation science. Implementation gaps describe the differences between what was planned and what occurred. They can occur in disaster preparations, in disaster responses, and in disaster recovery. Most often they are discussed as failures of different types: “we knew what to do but we didn’t do it”, or “we thought we knew what to do, but we didn’t really understand the situation”, or “we didn’t know enough”. But gaps can also be associated with positive outcomes: “there were unanticipated opportunities that people took advantage of”, or “the response  (or preparations or recovery) didn’t follow the plan, but it was successful anyway”. 

To facilitate discussion the organizers will prepare a short concept paper describing this approach toward an implementation science. A distinguished panel of discussants will respond to the paper,  drawing from their experience and adding their own insights. After the panel discussion, the larger audience will have the opportunity to contribute their insights and views. It is our hope that the discussion will have an influence on future IDRiM planning and activities.

Session organizers:

A Resilience Approach for Systemic Challenges in SDGs: Addressing Missing Links in Natural-Human-Social Systems and Macro-Micro Levels

Session rationale:

The session proposer has been working on a book titled A resilience approach to accelerate sustainable development goals (SDGs) in collaborations with others (to be published soon, Springer). The objective of the book is to articulate how to address systemic challenges driven by natural, human, and social risks at the local through global levels, many of which are integrated into Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The systemic challenges are interrelated with systemic risks and effects related to climate change and disaster risk management, and their characteristics are: 1) complex cause-effect structures from macro to microlevels, 2) multiple interacting components, and 3) multidimensional and cascading impacts and deep uncertainties. These challenges can be addressed by not fixing “a dot” but connecting dots to form lines, taking into account natural-human-social “living systems” in a continuum, and missing links in macro-micro levels. These are a part of resilience approach (Resilience Approach).

The major purpose of the session is to provide keys in addressing systemic challenges we are facing in a modern risk society based on the above book, The session highlights the questions: i) what is Resilience Approach for systemic challenges, ii) how the “living systems” are interrelated with Resilience Approach, and iii) why the macro-micro linkages are critical in addressing systemic challenges, and how the linkages can be addressed through Resilience Approach, by providing relevant case histories and studies.

Session organizers:

Field-based efforts to promote communicative dialogues with local residents and researchers from humanity science-study of an implementation gap

Session rationale:

This session has multiple purposes: to illustrate the need for addressing “an implementation gap” in  IDRiM which needs more communicative dialogues with local residents and researchers, particularly from humanity science, and to present field based practices to develop “communicative spaces” which has potential to promote communicative dialogues. 

 This proposed session is designed to be organized in combination with another related session:  “Implementation gaps are persistent phenomena in disaster risk management: can they guide the development of an implementation science?

Session organizers:

Spatial and Temporal Correlation in Disaster Risk Assessment: Challenges between Geographic and Economic perspectives

Session rationale:

Integrated disaster risk management needs multidisciplinary cooperation. A challenge for efficient cooperation is that scholars with different background cannot understand each other even on the same issue.

“Spatial and temporal correlation” is a typical issue in disaster risk assessment which highly concerned by researchers from different backgrounds, but lack of common understanding. E.g. economists may be very confused by the “risk map” provided by geographers which shows different risk levels with different colors. And geographers may be also surprised by the “dynamic economic analysis” proposed by economists which include “no actual temporal issue” in fact.

Understanding each other is a significant premise of cooperation. Therefore, focused on the “Spatial and Temporal Correlation in Disaster Risk Assessment”, we would like to propose a special session to discuss the different understandings and concerns between geography and economy.

Session organizers: